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Unread 01-22-2013, 04:39 PM   #1
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Default Is driving a manual hard?

I really want a manual car however I don't really have any manual cars I can test drive with and youtube videos make it sound so complicated is driving a manual a lot harder than automatic?

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Unread 01-22-2013, 04:51 PM   #2
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I'll repost part of what I said to a similar post...

Is it hard to learn? No. Frustrating and confusing at first. Just takes a day of occasional stalling out, another week or two to iron out your skill, and then you're good to go. Each time you hop in a different car it will be different, though.

That being said, almost anyone here will tell you to go for manual. It's more fun in my opinion in addition to enabling you to save yourself gas if you want to or to tool around if you want to. More freedom.

It all depends on your preference or what you'll be using this for. The only situation in which I wouldn't recommend it is constant stop-and-go traffic, though personally I don't mind it at all.

Keep in mind that selling a manual car can be difficult because there's much less demand, but again, it depends on the car.

To further the point, have someone who already knows how to drive one take you to a good parking lot or very quiet street. Practice starting from a stop. Practice starting on a hill especially. You'll be just fine with some practice.
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Unread 01-22-2013, 04:53 PM   #3
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You need a car to practice with and a place to practice.

Some cars are easy to learn on, some are tough. Most simple imports are a piece of cake to learn on. Corolla, Civic, Protege. As some clutches get old they engage very quickly and are hard for a beginner.

Hopefully you already know how to drive an automatic. The process of learning the rules of the road and at the same time being aware that you are not sure of how the controls work can be dangerous on the street. You don't want to be making a left turn and stall the car in front of an oncoming car, or get stuck on an incline with a car close behind you.

My son learned on a Chevy sprint. Light weight car with a smooth clutch, very progressive. I took him out to an open lot and explained what does what and what to expect will happen the first time so he didn't freak out. He stalled it a couple of times but after a few minutes he was driving like a boss.

I'm assuming you know how the clutch, transmission and gas pedal relate to each other.

As you ease the clutch out you need to know that you will reach a point where the car will start to move, it is AT THIS POINT you need to slow the releasing down as it will now engage very quickly from here on, and be completely engaged before the clutch pedal is all the way up.

Many beginners continue to let the clutch pedal up at the same rate as they did from the floor up to the point it began to engage, and it will cause the car to buck and rabbit hop as the load is increased on the engine with no increase in gas.

The other mistake beginners make is to give it way too much gas and slip the clutch like crazy, leading to burning out the clutch.

When the point of engagement is reached the engine speed only needs to be increased a bit and develop a "feel" for how quickly the clutch engages at this point. Once the car starts moving you can release the clutch a "bit" quicker, but wait until it actually starts moving or you will stall/rabbit hop.

Once the car is moving at more than a brisk walk, you do not need to be slipping the clutch anymore, so take your foot off it.

Practice just starting and stopping until you are confident before you try to shift gears. My son was at the point of getting bored before I thought he was ready to shift gears, but when he began shifting he at least didn't have to also have to think about using the clutch to start and stop anymore.

Just like riding a bike. You were sure you would never learn to ride, didn't seem possible, wiping out time and time again, and then suddenly the light came on and you just did it! Same thing with learning the clutch, you will stall and rabbit hop over and over and then one time you will suddenly realize, so that's what I need to do!
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Unread 01-22-2013, 04:55 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enderx475 View Post
I'll repost part of what I said to a similar post...

Is it hard to learn? No. Frustrating and confusing at first. Just takes a day of occasional stalling out, another week or two to iron out your skill, and then you're good to go. Each time you hop in a different car it will be different, though.

That being said, almost anyone here will tell you to go for manual. It's more fun in my opinion in addition to enabling you to save yourself gas if you want to or to tool around if you want to. More freedom.

It all depends on your preference or what you'll be using this for. The only situation in which I wouldn't recommend it is constant stop-and-go traffic, though personally I don't mind it at all.

Keep in mind that selling a manual car can be difficult because there's much less demand, but again, it depends on the car.
I've already decided I would really like a manual car however as far as gas mileage goes, the scion frs actually gets significantly higher gas mileage with the automatic version but the manual sounds like it would be a lot more fun. It's going to be hard to test drive it though since I probably won't be able to get any practice with a manual car until I get the frs.

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Unread 01-22-2013, 05:23 PM   #5
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I've already decided I would really like a manual car however as far as gas mileage goes, the scion frs actually gets significantly higher gas mileage with the automatic version but the manual sounds like it would be a lot more fun. It's going to be hard to test drive it though since I probably won't be able to get any practice with a manual car until I get the frs.
Depends how you drive it. I'd caution you against getting something like the FR-S as a first car -- I saw in your other post you're already looking at modifying it. Take things one at a time, man. You barely know how to drive the thing.
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Unread 01-22-2013, 05:26 PM   #6
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Depends how you drive it. I'd caution you against getting something like the FR-S as a first car -- I saw in your other post you're already looking at modifying it. Take things one at a time, man. You barely know how to drive the thing.
I know I'm just seeing what people's opinions are as far as modifying it, but I drive a 2005 Pontiac Vibe right now so this would be my second car, but why is the FRS a bad car for me?

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Unread 01-22-2013, 05:28 PM   #7
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I know I'm just seeing what people's opinions are as far as modifying it, but I drive a 2005 Pontiac Vibe right now so this would be my second car, but why is the FRS a bad car for me?
Sorry, I misunderstood. I meant that if it were a first car. Should be a startling upgrade from a Vibe... enjoy!
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Unread 01-22-2013, 05:31 PM   #8
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Sorry, I misunderstood. I meant that if it were a first car. Should be a startling upgrade from a Vibe... enjoy!
Lol nah I know how to drive just fine, just learning how to drive manual. Yeah man a vibe definetly isn't the fastest thing on the road but for a hatchback it's alright.

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Unread 01-22-2013, 06:42 PM   #9
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I learned on a 1986.5 Nissan Hardbody (pictured to the left).


I would take it out on joyrides, when it was still my dad's, and keep it only in the first gear around the block. We're talking suburbs, so not that huge of a block. Then, one day, my mom handed me the keys while heading out to take my dad his lunch. I was like, 'ferreal?' and her response was, 'for real.'

In the 10-15 mile drive to my dad's work, including interstate, I stalled it 3 times. Two of those times were on inclines, and the 3rd time was from a full stop.

The clutch had been replaced about 8 years prior, and the cable was stretched. It was a damn good clutch.

It's all about your driving style, your learning methods, your experience. The FR-S might not be the best car to learn with. Just my 2 cents.
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Unread 01-22-2013, 06:50 PM   #10
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Why do u think its not the best car to learn with?

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