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Unread 04-10-2010, 01:53 PM   #1
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Default New and curious to learn about car

Going to buy my first car in few years. So, want to start and get into understanding about cars.

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Unread 04-10-2010, 04:38 PM   #2
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How old are you? Its good to learn early about cars, that way you dont make alot of dumb mistakes right off the bat.
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"Straight roads are for fast cars, turns are for fast drivers."
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Unread 04-10-2010, 05:01 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by darkangel8 View Post
Aside from learning on it.. What important in cars is you know the basic steps on technically inspect cars. How to change tires, if you stock and your car stop in a highway what are you supposed to do, some stuff like that..
Agreed. At my high school there was (probably still is) two classes. There is the Basic Auto course for maintenance, and diagnosis skills. And then the advanced class where we would fix up real customer cars and do real work. Im using their shop to rebuild my front suspension on my 1989 Thunderbird.
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Originally Posted by Colin McRae
"Straight roads are for fast cars, turns are for fast drivers."
[1989 Ford Blunderbird / 1985 Ford Conestoga Ox-Cart 4x4 / 2004 Ford Fairmont GT]

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Unread 04-10-2010, 05:02 PM   #4
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I want to get an basic understanding of car. Such as what's in the car, all the real basic. Just like knowing all the computer component first in order to really understand in detail with each component. I want a whole picture first. Then I will dig more into detail. When I read something like E-break. I have no clue about what others are talking about. So, I will list what I know about a car. The rest, I hope you guys can help me complete the whole set.

I know that a car has
1. engine
2. wheels

That's about all I know. Sorry for being dumb. I am really a newbie, noob, beginner, or whatever you want to call me. I don't mind at all. I need to educate myself with knowledge of cars.

I kept on hearing people talking about cylinders and horsepower and all other stuffs, and I can't involve in what they are talking about cause I don't know anything about it

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Unread 04-10-2010, 06:58 PM   #5
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Cylinders are just that, cylinders, in which pistons move up and down in. Injectors and valves allow fuel and air into a "combustion chamber" or the area above the pistons. Then, the spark plug ignites the mixture, which explodes and expands, forcing the piston down. The pistons are attached to connecting rods (often just called 'rods' on the bottom, which are attached to a crankshaft. The crankshaft has pieces that extend, which allows the rods to connect to it. After the piston reaches the bottom, the crankshaft keeps spinning, forcing the piston back up. And from there, the sequence starts again. On the end of the crankshaft, sits the flywheel. It's a piece of metal that's a circle. The transmission connects to this. The transmission, or tranny, takes that and puts it through a driveshaft (only on rear wheel drive and 4WD vehicles, FWDs don't have driveshafts), and also shifts. The driveshaft turns under the car, and the other end goes into the differential, which transfers that rotary action out to the axle, and then turns the wheels.

There's your basic rundown of how it works. As far as the horsepower and cylinders, the engine name determines cylinder count. For example, a V6 engine (i'm sure you've heard that reference) has six cylinders, in a V formation. An Inline 4 engine has four cylinders straight in a line, without a V. For the most part, these are your configurations
Inline 3 cyl (a few very small cars have these, like Geo Metros, Ford Sprints, etc)
Inline 4 cyl (most small cars have these. Hondas, Toyotas, Nissans, Fords, GMs, they all have four bangers (slang term for inline four) available
Inline 6 cyl (most BMWs, and older Ford trucks have these. Not too common)
V6 (most midsized sedans, small trucks, vans, some fullsized trucks have these.)
V8 (sports cars and most trucks have these)
You also have V10s and V12s, but they're more exclusive to Dodge, put in the Vipers and trucks. Really pointless IMO, a well tuned V8 is just as good.

Horsepower is how much power a car can make. My dad told me it's measured by how many horses a car can theoretically pull if geared right. That may be incorrect, someone correct it if it is. Basically, most small cars make around 100 horsepower, and trucks can get up to about 400 for a big pickup. My Chevy Silverado 2500 makes around 330 HP if i remember right. Torque is also important. That's how much of that power actually gets to the wheels. Diesels make far more torque than gas engines do.
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Unread 04-10-2010, 10:27 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wierdo124 View Post
Cylinders are just that, cylinders, in which pistons move up and down in. Injectors and valves allow fuel and air into a "combustion chamber" or the area above the pistons. Then, the spark plug ignites the mixture, which explodes and expands, forcing the piston down. The pistons are attached to connecting rods (often just called 'rods' on the bottom, which are attached to a crankshaft. The crankshaft has pieces that extend, which allows the rods to connect to it. After the piston reaches the bottom, the crankshaft keeps spinning, forcing the piston back up. And from there, the sequence starts again. On the end of the crankshaft, sits the flywheel. It's a piece of metal that's a circle. The transmission connects to this. The transmission, or tranny, takes that and puts it through a driveshaft (only on rear wheel drive and 4WD vehicles, FWDs don't have driveshafts), and also shifts. The driveshaft turns under the car, and the other end goes into the differential, which transfers that rotary action out to the axle, and then turns the wheels.

There's your basic rundown of how it works. As far as the horsepower and cylinders, the engine name determines cylinder count. For example, a V6 engine (i'm sure you've heard that reference) has six cylinders, in a V formation. An Inline 4 engine has four cylinders straight in a line, without a V. For the most part, these are your configurations
Inline 3 cyl (a few very small cars have these, like Geo Metros, Ford Sprints, etc)
Inline 4 cyl (most small cars have these. Hondas, Toyotas, Nissans, Fords, GMs, they all have four bangers (slang term for inline four) available
Inline 6 cyl (most BMWs, and older Ford trucks have these. Not too common)
V6 (most midsized sedans, small trucks, vans, some fullsized trucks have these.)
V8 (sports cars and most trucks have these)
You also have V10s and V12s, but they're more exclusive to Dodge, put in the Vipers and trucks. Really pointless IMO, a well tuned V8 is just as good.

Horsepower is how much power a car can make. My dad told me it's measured by how many horses a car can theoretically pull if geared right. That may be incorrect, someone correct it if it is. Basically, most small cars make around 100 horsepower, and trucks can get up to about 400 for a big pickup. My Chevy Silverado 2500 makes around 330 HP if i remember right. Torque is also important. That's how much of that power actually gets to the wheels. Diesels make far more torque than gas engines do.
Well, torque is a measurement of twisting force. Torque is the amount of force it takes to turn a wrench, horsepower is the ease at which I can turn the wrench after I get it going.

The definitions of the engine designs and how an engine works are spot on.

Inline 6 engines are more common than you think, all Cummins powered trucks, most pre-2005 Jeeps, The Atlas I-6 (and I-5) that GM makes for Chevrolet Blazers and GMC Envoys.

V10 and V12s are mostly found in exotic or super expensive luxury cars.

Cars need much more than that to work though, they need a suspension system (a network of springs and shocks) to absorb force from the road or when carrying a load. The braking system uses fluid to compress pads onto disks behind the wheels causing them to slow to a stop, like bicycle brakes. Older cars use shoes that are pushed out against a rotating drum creating friction and slowing the vehicle.

There is a ton of stuff in cars that is interconnected and equally important. Welcome to the world of cars.

It also helps to know where our cars come from and who they are made by:

USA:

Ford: Ford, Mercury, Lincoln, Mazda, Edsel (lol!) (formerly Jaguar, Land Rover, Aston Martin)
General Motors: Chevrolet, GMC, Pontiac, Buick, Oldsmobile, Saab, Hummer, Cadillac, Geo, Delorean (lol!)
Chrysler Corporation: Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Plymouth, Eagle, Desoto, Valiant...

Japan:

Honda: Honda, Acura
Toyota: Toyota, Scion, Lexus
Nissan: Nissan, Datsun, Infiniti
Fuji Heavy Industries: Subaru
Suzuki: Suzuki
Daihatsu: Daihatsu

Korea:

Hyundai: Hyundai, Kia

India:

Tata Motors: Tata, Jaguar, NEW Land Rovers

England:

Rover: Rover, MG, OLD Land Rovers
Aston Martin: Aston Martin

Germany:

BMW: BMW, MINI
Daimler-Benz: Mercedes Benz, Smart, Maybach
VW Group: Volkswagen, Audi, Lamborghini, Bugatti, Porsche

Italy:

Ferrari: Ferrari
FIAT: FIAT, All Chrysler listed above

France:

Renault: Renault
Citroen: Citroen
__________________
Its an MN-12 thing... you wouldnt understand.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colin McRae
"Straight roads are for fast cars, turns are for fast drivers."
[1989 Ford Blunderbird / 1985 Ford Conestoga Ox-Cart 4x4 / 2004 Ford Fairmont GT]

Last edited by Raptor22; 04-10-2010 at 11:23 PM.

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Unread 04-10-2010, 11:42 PM   #7
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I was trying to be simplistic
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Unread 04-10-2010, 11:47 PM   #8
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lol if you want to know anything about inline sixes, I'm one of the guys to have a chat with as I actually have one. Runs great, too.

What I like about my inline six:

SUPER smooth
Long-lasting(265,000 miles and still purrs)
quite torquey(Doesn't mind the 2.49 diff gears I have)
Starts VERY easily, usually instantly.
very easy to work on, everything's logically laid out and nothing's hiding anything
simple
amazingly efficient for technology that originated in the 1940s
No timing chain or belt to worry about, that's handled by two steel gears.

What I don't like about them:

My engine is three feet long. I have about two inches of crumple zone if I hit anything, then the engine gets pushed into the seat next to me
Airflow in and out can be improved on most, as they're not crossflow. Or, if they are crossflow, ignition work can be a bit difficult.
Performance bits are a bit harder to find(But not impossible)
Some idiots tend to make fun of it "LOL YOU GOT A PUNY SIX CYLINDER" "LOL THAT THING AIN'T GOT NOTHING TO IT", etc etc
Doesn't have a rev band to speak of. 4100RPM is the Ford specified redline, and it loses any hint of power at 3500 or so.
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My rigs:

1985 Ford F150 | 4x2 | 300ci OHV inline six | 4-speed OD manual | 310K | No power brakes | Running 100% - It hasn't driven this good in 15 years!

1984 Ford F150 | 4x2 | 300ci six | granny four | 3.55 rear end | 210K | Brakes shot. Rear drums are doing most of the work. Not fit to drive due to that.
1997 Ford Explorer XLT | 4.0L Vulcan V6 | 5-speed automatic | shift-on-the-fly 4WD | 210,000 miles | Running 95% - Needs brakes on all four corners + bald tires
1989 Ford F150 | 300cid six...again | 5-speed | 4x4 | 160K | Needs brakes done as well. Oi!

Last edited by Kenny McCormick; 04-10-2010 at 11:51 PM.

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Unread 04-10-2010, 11:51 PM   #9
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You can't beat a L6 for dependability.
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Unread 04-11-2010, 12:03 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TestECull View Post
lol if you want to know anything about inline sixes, I'm one of the guys to have a chat with as I actually have one. Runs great, too.

What I like about my inline six:

SUPER smooth
Long-lasting(265,000 miles and still purrs)
quite torquey(Doesn't mind the 2.49 diff gears I have)
Starts VERY easily, usually instantly.
very easy to work on, everything's logically laid out and nothing's hiding anything
simple
amazingly efficient for technology that originated in the 1940s
No timing chain or belt to worry about, that's handled by two steel gears.

What I don't like about them:

My engine is three feet long. I have about two inches of crumple zone if I hit anything, then the engine gets pushed into the seat next to me
Airflow in and out can be improved on most, as they're not crossflow. Or, if they are crossflow, ignition work can be a bit difficult.
Performance bits are a bit harder to find(But not impossible)
Some idiots tend to make fun of it "LOL YOU GOT A PUNY SIX CYLINDER" "LOL THAT THING AIN'T GOT NOTHING TO IT", etc etc
Doesn't have a rev band to speak of. 4100RPM is the Ford specified redline, and it loses any hint of power at 3500 or so.
Yup, totally agreed. This is coming from the owner of an 89 F-150 with the 300 big six. I usually shift at 3000 RPMs, it doesn't like climbing much higher than that. I-6s are inherently balanced so there is no energy loss containing vibration. I love the torque and I just give non-believers a ride. My 3.55 gears and limited slips certainly help.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lautinjr View Post
You can't beat a L6 for dependability.
Yup.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wierdo124 View Post
I was trying to be simplistic
Well the engine is something thats difficult to be simplistic with, I mean you got into talking about camshafts and connecting rods and rockers and valves. Haha.
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Its an MN-12 thing... you wouldnt understand.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colin McRae
"Straight roads are for fast cars, turns are for fast drivers."
[1989 Ford Blunderbird / 1985 Ford Conestoga Ox-Cart 4x4 / 2004 Ford Fairmont GT]

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