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Unread 07-20-2006, 09:19 AM   #1
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Default Finish Protection

So your ready to "Wax" your little beauty.
The term wax these days is actually a spill over from the days of "Lacquer" which required wax not only to help the finish shine but seal the fraqile and constantly drying paint. Yes laquer is constantly drying an is only finally dry when it chalks out to the point of losing it's shine that will never return
Somewhere in between yesterdays laquer and todays urethane based paints had the far more durable that laquer replacement of enamel which is also better off with the modern form of finish protection that the urethanes prefer.

Todays paint on the other hand, whether it be medium or high solid acrylic urethane based, do not require the same protection as yesterdays Laquer types.
Polymer based car finish protectants still commonly called "car wax" which it isnt, protect the finish far better than wax.
The advantages of polymer finsh protectors are it's ability to inhibit damage from UV Rays, acid rain and the ever popular bird bombs.

How I recommend prepping a car for a fine polymer finish protection.
1. Clean it well, when reapplying a polymer, my choice of cleaning revolves around a good washing with dish soap. Mix it about 2x stronger that you would for washing dishes. It is strong enough to remove road film, oily deposits, etc... with out damaging the vehicle in any way.
Always wrinse thoroughly and dry. Some will prefere the chamois (shammy, chammy or chammie) whether it be natural or synthetic or a bath towel. What ever suits you.

2. A word of caution, polymer finish protectors have a tendancy to chalk out the satin or flat black trim panels and even the rubber seals. Either avoid them compleatly of if you please border tape them but only use automotive grade tape. Other tapes tend to leave behind glue residue

3. CAUTION!
NEVER apply wax or polymers in direct Sun light!

4. Be cheep, real cheep, did I say cheep, yes I did.
The biggest mistake is the quantity of material used. Not that it will comprimise the quality of the job, just increase the labor to complete the task
Actually the least most minimal amount needed to coat the surface is all that is required for a full quality application
May it be that you have found removing the polymer, once it's chalked out and ready for removal, find it's just as difficult as "wax" you have in fact put it on to thick in the application phase! That is why I say "cheep"

5. Washing a car by hand to compliment the fine polymer finish protection.
Avoid the harsher dish soap and use an automotive car wash soap.
Dry with your preferd method of either a chanios or bath towel

Enjoy
Hope I've been helpful
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Last edited by The Duke; 02-20-2009 at 03:28 PM.

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Unread 07-20-2006, 10:00 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Duke
4. Be cheep, real cheep, did I say cheep, yes I did.
The biggest mistake is the quantity of material used. Not that it will comprimise the quality of the job, just increase the labor to complete the task
Actually the least most minimal amount needed to coat the surface is all that is required for a full quality application
May it be that you have found removing the polymer, once it's chalked out and ready for removal, find it's just as difficult as "wax" you have in fact put it on to thick in the application phase! That is why I say "cheep"
Sounds a lot like applying as5, lol. Nice guide, i never knew waxing is so difficult, i always thought you pour the wax on a cloth and scrub away!

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Unread 07-20-2006, 11:16 PM   #3
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I would advise against using dish detergent to wash your baby... Honestly, don't be so cheap here. Some formulations of dish soap are quite harmful to new finishes. Drop by a car collector show and chat with the fellas and casually mention that you use dish soap on your ride. They'll have to carry you out. For my baby I use RainX's autowash. It's not expensive at around $5 for a bottle that will last many washes and even if you choose not to wax afterwards it coats the car in a barrier of RainX protectant to help your beauty fight off water stains and other environmental disasters that plot to ruin your finish.

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Unread 07-20-2006, 11:39 PM   #4
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What would be a good, easy way to get those small tar spots off? You know those small spots that almost never come off with normal soap. My friend recomended using kerosene on a rag, but then again he dosent really care how his car looks all that often.

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Unread 07-20-2006, 11:44 PM   #5
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First, use auto soap, much better than dish soap. And yes, for the sake of not using so many wax applicators (socks) you should use as little wax as is required to get a good chalk to the finish.

As for the tar spots... very carefully use a razor blade. Yes, if you are quite careful and come in at a very small angle using a fresh blade, you can scrape tar and pine sap and a number of adhesive solids off your finish with little or no damage to the clear coat.

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Unread 07-21-2006, 12:34 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Bartender Paradox
What would be a good, easy way to get those small tar spots off? You know those small spots that almost never come off with normal soap. My friend recomended using kerosene on a rag, but then again he dosent really care how his car looks all that often.
Gook Off...or Bug and tar remover
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Unread 07-21-2006, 10:16 AM   #7
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I think kerosene would work, just use a small amount. Do a test spot under a bumper or something to be sure. I use a solvent called tek-solve. It seems to be kerosene based.
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Unread 07-24-2006, 01:10 PM   #8
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Dish soap hurts the finish, NOT!
Acrylic automotive finish are very durable, for a very short period, even 3 Dot brake fluid won't attack it!
Dish soap is fine!
BTW, I've been entering and winning AutoRama shows for over 20 years, ASE Master Certified and a car show judge.
If dish soap was so harmful, would you eat off the plates and drink from the glasses?
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Last edited by The Duke; 07-24-2006 at 01:38 PM.

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Unread 07-27-2006, 06:17 PM   #9
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Ok here is what I do.

1. wash the car with good soap ( i use meguiars)

2. dry with soft cloth ie microfiber

3. Get your clay bar and lube.
You can get a clay bar kit at any auto shop worth anything. It comes with a bottle of QD (quick detail) for lube. All you do is spray the qd on and rub the clay bar on the paint. No need to push or anything. Once you see it start to get dirty work it until its clean again. If it starts to stick use more qd.

4. once the clay barring is done we move on to the polish stage.
Use good polish. I reccomend 3m finish it. It is a little expensive but well worth it. By hand this sucks so I use my buffer to apply and to buff out.

5. After I polish I use what is called the Klasse twins. They consist of Klasse all in one that says it is a polish but isnt a very strong one. It basically preps for the next stage. The other is Klasse sealent glaze. Start with the AIO and do it like the polish but do it by hand.

6. after a coat of AIO move on to the SG. Now the SG only has to go on very thin so be spairing. I reccomend a coat a day. I usually do 3-5 coats. It has to cure between coats because it is an acrylic.

7. after however many coats you choose are finished I move on to a goos carnuba wax. Do one nice coat of wax and she will shine brighter than you ever thought possible. Plus the Klasse SG lasts for 6 months so you don't have to do it near as much.


Some other tips: make a small bucket when you wash to do the wheels first. After that clean the bucket and fill it again for the rest of the car. if you drop a microfiber do NOT ever use it on the car again as it will just scratch it. You can get the klaase twins online. They are expensive but a great investment.

I am a detailing nut so if you have any questions let me know.
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Last edited by cdub998; 07-27-2006 at 06:20 PM.

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Unread 03-15-2007, 12:09 PM   #10
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I edited for speeling, not grammer yet. Just ffor you.
Quote:
So your ready to "Wax" your little beauty.
The term wax these days is actually a spill over from the days of "Lacquer" which required wax not only to help the finish shine but seal the fragile and constantly drying paint. Yes lacquer is constantly drying an is only finally dry when it chalks out to the point of losing it's shine that will never return. Somewhere in between yesterdays lacquer and todays urethane based paints had the far more durable that lacquer replacement of enamel which is also better off with the modern form of finish protection that the urethanes prefer.

Todays paint on the other hand, whether it be medium or high solid acrylic urethane based, do not require the same protection as yesterdays Lacquer types.
Polymer based car finish protectants still commonly called "car wax" which it isn't, protect the finish far better than wax.
The advantages of polymer finish protectors are it's ability to inhibit damage from UV Rays, acid rain and the ever popular bird bombs.

How I recommend prepping a car for a fine polymer finish protection.
1. Clean it well, when reapplying a polymer, my choice of cleaning revolves around a good washing with dish soap. Mix it about 2x stronger that you would for washing dishes. It is strong enough to remove road film, oily deposits, etc... with out damaging the vehicle in any way.
Always rinse thoroughly and dry. Some will prefer the chamois (shammy, chammy or chammie) whether it be natural or synthetic or a bath towel. What ever suits you.

2. A word of caution, polymer finish protectors have a tendency to chalk out the satin or flat black trim panels and even the rubber seals. Either avoid them completely of if you please border tape them but only use automotive grade tape. Other tapes tend to leave behind glue residue

3. CAUTION!
NEVER apply wax or polymers in direct Sun light!

4. Be cheap, real cheap, did I say cheap? Yes I did.
The biggest mistake is the quantity of material used. Not that it will compromise the quality of the job, just increase the labor to complete the task
Actually the least most minimal amount needed to coat the surface is all that is required for a full quality application
May it be that you have found removing the polymer, once it's chalked out and ready for removal, find it's just as difficult as "wax" you have in fact put it on to thick in the application phase! That is why I say "cheap"

5. Washing a car by hand to compliment the fine polymer finish protection.
Avoid the harsher dish soap and use an automotive car wash soap.
Dry with your preferred method of either a chamois or bath towel

Enjoy
Hope I've been helpful
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Last edited by KSIMP88; 03-15-2007 at 12:11 PM.

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