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Unread 11-14-2009, 02:39 PM   #1
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Default Maximum Tire Pressure (PSI)

Always Always Always fill you tires to the maximum recommended PSI on the sidewall of your tires, if you want optimum tread wear and fuel economy.
I asked a grad from an automotive tech school...

The dealer door panel recommended PSI is for comfort. You CAN set it to that if you want a smoother ride, but If you want the best economy, you go by the Maximum Recommended PSI on the SIDEWALL.


If I'm not mistaken, tire warranties only work if you use the maximum recommended PSI on the sidewall of the tire. Stop by any tire shop, walmart TLE, etc. They will tell you the same thing.


I'm not looking to start a bumpy thread, I just want to make sure people know the FACTS.
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Unread 11-14-2009, 03:13 PM   #2
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1) It's a matter of personal preference...you contradict yourself. You say set it to the dealer recommended PSI if you want comfort, but then you say to Always Always ALWAYS fill it to maximum.
2) You must be mistaken, because we've always ran ours at the door sticker PSI and never had a warranty problem.
3) What facts? That you should fill your tires up to whatever suits you? I agree!

Unfortunately i don't get any better fuel economy regardless, and couldn't care less.
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Unread 11-14-2009, 03:27 PM   #3
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All you're going to get by filling it up to the sidewall pressure is a rough ride, increased wear in the center of the tire, reduced traction especially in rain and snow (affects BRAKING). THE PRESSURE ON THE SIDEWALL IS THE MAXIMUM SAFE PRESSURE THE TIRES CAN HANDLE. As you drive, the tires heat up. When air heats up, it expands. This causes your tire pressure to rise so if you filled it to the max when it was cold as soon as it heats up it's going to be over. Sure you may get less roll resistance but at the cost of replacing your tires more frequently and the possibility of not being able to control the car, I'll stick with what the engineers who designed my car determined for my tire pressure.

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Unread 11-14-2009, 03:31 PM   #4
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You shouldn't do max. Mine are rated for 30 on the door panel, I do 34. The max is 40. Filling to max will make you wear the tires excessively in the center. Too little and you're wearing it on the outside. If you don't know what you're doing, run what it says on the door panel.
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Unread 11-14-2009, 03:59 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wierdo124 View Post
1) It's a matter of personal preference...you contradict yourself. You say set it to the dealer recommended PSI if you want comfort, but then you say to Always Always ALWAYS fill it to maximum.
2) You must be mistaken, because we've always ran ours at the door sticker PSI and never had a warranty problem.
3) What facts? That you should fill your tires up to whatever suits you? I agree!

Unfortunately i don't get any better fuel economy regardless, and couldn't care less.
1) Always run it for maximum economy. I'll rephrase post 1. thx
2) That was speculation, thus in parenthesis. "if I'm not mistaken"
3) Fact being the maximum recommended PSI on the tire is what you should set them to. Check the pressure regularly.

Quote:
All you're going to get by filling it up to the sidewall pressure is a rough ride, increased wear in the center of the tire, reduced traction especially in rain and snow (affects BRAKING). THE PRESSURE ON THE SIDEWALL IS THE MAXIMUM SAFE PRESSURE THE TIRES CAN HANDLE. As you drive, the tires heat up. When air heats up, it expands. This causes your tire pressure to rise so if you filled it to the max when it was cold as soon as it heats up it's going to be over. Sure you may get less roll resistance but at the cost of replacing your tires more frequently and the possibility of not being able to control the car, I'll stick with what the engineers who designed my car determined for my tire pressure.
1) Setting the tires to the door panel wears the outer tread, as the tires are under inflated.
2) Fully inflated tires get better traction on slick roads.
3) Fully inflated tires cause even tread wear, thus longer tire life
4) The people who designed your car don't care if your tires last forever. They want you to have a sooth ride, so you keep buying their cars.

For questions about your car, ask a mechanic. For questions about tires, ask a tire tech. Go ahead, go to les schwaab. I'll wait.

Quote:
You shouldn't do max. Mine are rated for 30 on the door panel, I do 34. The max is 40. Filling to max will make you wear the tires excessively in the center. Too little and you're wearing it on the outside. If you don't know what you're doing, run what it says on the door panel.
Filling below the max introduces excessive wear on the outer tread. Inflating over the max introduces excessive tread wear in the center. Even tread wear is best obtained by following the sidewall recommended PSI.
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Unread 11-14-2009, 04:01 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KSIMP88 View Post
1) always run it for maximum economy. I'll rephrase post 1.
2)Thjat was speculation, thus in parenthesis. "if I'm not mistaken"
3)Fact being the maximum recommended PSI on the tire is what you should set them to. Check the pressure regularly.
2) I realize that...just pointing out you were indeed mistaken.
3) Again, contradicting yourself. Fill it to what suits you, enough said.
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Unread 11-14-2009, 04:06 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wierdo124 View Post
2) I realize that...just pointing out you were indeed mistaken.
3) Again, contradicting yourself. Fill it to what suits you, enough said.
Dunno about contradicting myself, but true enough, do what you want, but If you are looking for optimum fuel economy and tire life, set it to the maximum recommended on the sidewall.
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Unread 11-14-2009, 04:19 PM   #8
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As I told you last time you said this, wrong wrong worng worng wognrwognwrognworgnotjhbty. And wrong.


You're just going to murder your tires and slide all over the road.


Funny thing, those sidewall PSIs. If I run my tires at that, my truck starts sliding all over the damn place. Can't really keep it under control. Drop them from the 45PSI on their sidewalls to the 35PSI my door sticker claims and alluvasudden it won't slide if I ask it to. Also, if I run it at the 45PSI the sidewalls list, I chew the centers to shreds.


The setting on the door is the setting at which your tires are supposed to run. Running it at anything else is just going to cause problems.

When the car's built, they set that recommended PSI for safety reasons, fuel economy, reliability, tire life, etc etc. Noone's gonna buy a car who eats it's tires, you know. You'll have very little traction at full PSI, and as others have said, you'll absolutely shred your centers.

Boy, I'm glad you're in Oregon. I won't have to dodge any of your tire debris when you do have a blowout. And it's a when, not an if, if you run them at their max safe PSI. It goes over that as they warm up.
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Unread 11-14-2009, 04:23 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TestECull View Post
As I told you last time you said this, wrong wrong worng worng wognrwognwrognworgnotjhbty. And wrong.


You're just going to murder your tires and slide all over the road.


Funny thing, those sidewall PSIs. If I run my tires at that, my truck starts sliding all over the damn place. Can't really keep it under control. Drop them from the 45PSI on their sidewalls to the 35PSI my door sticker claims and alluvasudden it won't slide if I ask it to. Also, if I run it at the 45PSI the sidewalls list, I chew the centers to shreds.


The setting on the door is the setting at which your tires are supposed to run. Running it at anything else is just going to cause problems.

Boy, I'm glad you're in Oregon. I won't have to dodge any of your tire debris when you do have a blowout. And it's a when, not an if, if you run them at their max safe PSI. It goes over that as they warm up.
Are your tires what you tuck was designed for? If not, you are dealing with a different scenario. If your tires ARE the size the dealer recommends, then let's see a vid of you loosing grip and sliding while driving normally.
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Unread 11-14-2009, 04:48 PM   #10
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The only reason you should ever inflate your tires to a pressure different than the pressure specified by the manufacturer is if you put some low profile tires on or something.

Or what I usually do is when it's cold outside and I'm putting air in the tires inside somewhere then I'll put a few PSI over what it says on the door to make up for the pressure lost due to cold weather.

Last edited by Felipe the Ant; 11-14-2009 at 04:51 PM.

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