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Unread 11-30-2009, 10:17 PM   #1
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Default pilot bearing removal

any advice out there about removing a pilot bearing.
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Unread 11-30-2009, 11:31 PM   #2
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A puller is the correct method, however many times it can be removed by packing the cavity with thick grease and then using a snug fitting punch, dowel, or socket extension and driving it in with a hammer. the pressure created inside will pop the bushing out.

Should work slick on your Chevy.
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Unread 12-01-2009, 06:34 AM   #3
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When I did my clutch, the manual mentioned the grease method as best, especially if you want to re-use the bearing afterwards.
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Unread 03-03-2010, 01:29 PM   #4
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Heres a link to any pilot bearing removal tools you could imagine.
http://www.google.com/products?q=pil...ed=0CCcQrQQwAA

You will never be able to remove a pilot bearing with a punch or a socket. You need to grab its inside edge with a tool.

Reuse a pilot bearing? NEVER. If you are replacing a clutch, a flywheel always put a NEW pilot bearing in. Nothing worse than having to pull it apart again.... because you were being cheap and didnt want to spend $10 on a bearing.
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Unread 03-03-2010, 04:34 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IamWedge View Post
Reuse a pilot bearing? NEVER. If you are replacing a clutch, a flywheel always put a NEW pilot bearing in. Nothing worse than having to pull it apart again.... because you were being cheap and didnt want to spend $10 on a bearing.

Uhhh, I think you mean bushing. If you have a bushing, always replace it. If you have a bearing, as long as the bearing is not worn, just add new grease to it and you're good.


I did a clutch job on my F150 recently. I was planning on changing it as I thought it had a bushing, turned out it had a bearing. My dad felt it and said it would be fine if I repacked it. Now, he's been working on cars since he was a teenager, and he's 55 now. He also spent quite a few years in the Air Force doing hydraulic and suspension work on all sorts of aircraft, such as C130s and F4 Phantoms. I think he knows a thing or two about bearings...

So that's exactly what I did. Repacked it, stuck the trans back in, so far so good.
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1997 Ford Explorer XLT | 4.0L Vulcan V6 | 5-speed automatic | shift-on-the-fly 4WD | 210,000 miles | Running 95% - Needs brakes on all four corners + bald tires
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Unread 03-03-2010, 07:23 PM   #6
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My point is... that at transmission shops or even in any sort of fleet vehicle work. If you are inside the bell housing doing a transmission rebuild, clutch, flywheel work. Its common practice to replace the pilot bearing. bushing or bearing type. Nothing worse than doing all that work and have someone say they have an annoying whining sound after you have completed the work.
Yes you can repack and replace. But you are still replacing a worn part back in there. Sorta like rebuilding your starter and putting your old mesh gear back on it. You cant see whats on the races. If I did tranny work and the cust told me they dont want the pilot replaced... I tell em. If your pilot bearing fails. You have to pay the hours to have the transmission R/R for a $10 part. Its not cost effective. Its a waste of money if you take the chance.

There are certain combinations of parts that should be replaced when doing any maintenance work or overhauling on your car.
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Unread 03-03-2010, 07:36 PM   #7
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lol, so you're saying I should have taken out a needle bearing that still works fine and put in a crappy little oilite bushing instead? My clutch kit came with two of them, one of which would have fit my application.


Brilliant. Downgrade and replace a perfectly good part. Trust me, there's a reason I had my dad look at it. He knows a thing or two about bearings, and if it had been bad I would have replaced it.


By the way, there's no whirring. He was right. Old bearing still works just fine, and it's loving the fresh grease.
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1984 Ford F150 | 4x2 | 300ci six | granny four | 3.55 rear end | 210K | Brakes shot. Rear drums are doing most of the work. Not fit to drive due to that.
1997 Ford Explorer XLT | 4.0L Vulcan V6 | 5-speed automatic | shift-on-the-fly 4WD | 210,000 miles | Running 95% - Needs brakes on all four corners + bald tires
1989 Ford F150 | 300cid six...again | 5-speed | 4x4 | 160K | Needs brakes done as well. Oi!

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Unread 03-04-2010, 11:47 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TestECull View Post
lol, so you're saying I should have taken out a needle bearing that still works fine and put in a crappy little oilite bushing instead? My clutch kit came with two of them, one of which would have fit my application.


Brilliant. Downgrade and replace a perfectly good part. Trust me, there's a reason I had my dad look at it. He knows a thing or two about bearings, and if it had been bad I would have replaced it.


By the way, there's no whirring. He was right. Old bearing still works just fine, and it's loving the fresh grease.
Heres what im saying.
To the general users of these forums. Im not directing this at you Testecull. Im pointing out what is done in the industry and is good practice to follow. Im not telling you to replace your pilot bearing. What you do in your own garage with your dad's keen eye is up to you. The bushings are ussually updates to needle bearing type bearings. You can still buy the needle bearings. If you dont have whirring.... thats wonderful. But it doesnt change the fact that its a used, worn part you put back into place.... after removing it. Thats all.
Maybe think about the others on the forum that read these post. They want to know what they should do with their cars. Your dad cant look at everyones pilot bearing now can he?
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Unread 03-04-2010, 03:44 PM   #9
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lol, if it was a bushing I wouldn't have hesitated to change it. Those things suck.

I would recommend they replace a bushing, and have a bearing inspected by someone who knows bearings. IF it's bad, replace it, if it's good, repack and reuse. It's not difficult to tell if a bearing is going to fail, they feel real bad and grainy.


Attack each situation as it comes, not use a blanket policy. Better results happen.
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My rigs:

1985 Ford F150 | 4x2 | 300ci OHV inline six | 4-speed OD manual | 310K | No power brakes | Running 100% - It hasn't driven this good in 15 years!

1984 Ford F150 | 4x2 | 300ci six | granny four | 3.55 rear end | 210K | Brakes shot. Rear drums are doing most of the work. Not fit to drive due to that.
1997 Ford Explorer XLT | 4.0L Vulcan V6 | 5-speed automatic | shift-on-the-fly 4WD | 210,000 miles | Running 95% - Needs brakes on all four corners + bald tires
1989 Ford F150 | 300cid six...again | 5-speed | 4x4 | 160K | Needs brakes done as well. Oi!

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